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1967 YEAR BOOK 

WITH REPORTS FOR 1965-1966 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



The Massachusetts Horticultural Society is a non-profit 
membership organization, incorporated June 2, 1829, for 
the purpose of encouraging the practice of horticulture 
and the art of gardening. 







PRESIDENT'S REPORT 1966 

During the year 1966 the Massachusetts Horti- 
cultural Society underwent several significant 
changes. It was a difficult year in many ways. 

First, was the prolonged illness of our President, 
Oliver Wolcott. He entered the hospital in early 
summer last year and did not return to his home 
until October where he was making a slow but 
steady recovery until early March of this year. He 
was, in fact, planning to attend the Spring Flower 
Show, but had a set-back and died on March 11. 
The Society will greatly miss his wise counsel and 
effective administration. In addition, his loss will 
be keenly felt not only by his family but also by 
his community. Since the beginning of Mr. Wol- 
cott's illness, the Executive Committee has assumed 
the functions of the President in order to continue 
to administer effectively the affairs of the Society. 

After nearly three years of work devoted to the 
editorial and physical improvement of HORTI- 
CULTURE, a long series of testing programs were 
completed to determine how and to whom the 
magazine could best be sold. On the basis of this 
information the Society undertook the largest 
single subscription campaign of its history. It was 
a very expensive mail promotion program, but it 
was undertaken to bring HORTICULTURE to a 
level of circulation at which the magazine would 
no longer be a financial burden to the Society. As 
a result of the program, I am happy to report that 
we have boosted our circulation from 86,000 in 
January to 123,000 in December - a growth of 
about 45 per cent. 

As a result of this increase, we will announce 
new advertising rates in August, to become effec- . 
tive on January 1, 1968. This is the first rate in- 
crease in 1 3 years, and will help the HORTICUL- 
TURE budget significantly in 1968. It is too early 
to forecast subscription renewals for 1967 at this 
time. The first 3 months showed a marked im- 



provement. However, 1967 is a crucial year de- 
pending on the further trend of subscription re- 
newals. Mr. Lees, our Executive Secretary, and 
Mr. Bates, our Business Manager, are optimistic 
to the point of predicting the magazine itself will 
break even this year, even before the benefit of the 
increase in advertising income materializes. I hope 
they are correct. 

I'm pleased to report, too, that the Trustees have 
agreed to engage as a consultant a recognized maga- 
zine publication expert to further examine our 
procedures and policies and to give us his- appraisal 
of HORTICULTURE'S present position and its 
potential for the future to further check on our own 
judgment. 

The fulfillment, (that is the maintenance and 
servicing of the subscription list of HORTICUL- 
TURE), has been extremely difficult problem. The 
difficulties started early in the year after the death 
of the key person in the fulfillment company hand- 
ling our list. We had to shift to another company 
during the hectic days of the 1966 Spring Flower 
Show. Then, due to the limitations of our old 
system and equipment and the anticipated growth 
in circulation, a shift was made to computer opera- 
tion. Conversion of a mailing list to a computer is 
by no means a simple problem. We are making 
significant strides with this problem, however, and 
while we know the list will never be perfect (there 
are approximately 1,000 address changes, alone, 
each month) we are striving for efficiency. 

Mailing problems have been complicated, too, by 
the growth, of our subscription list, by zip coding 
and by the difficulties of a large postal operation. 

We have invested heavily in time, effort and 
money, and while we are extremely hopeful, and 
at the moment indications are good, we cannot 
measure the results until the year has passed. 

Perhaps the most significant single accomplish- 
ment of the year was a re-examination of the pur- 

continued on page 5 







Page 1 

Planting Day in Dorchester 
August 4, 1966. 



Page 2 

Top: The Pilot Garden of the 
Roxbury / Dorchester Community 
Beautification Committee is a co- 
operative effort of many groups 
and organizations which were 
brought together by the Massachu- 
setts Horticultural Society. 

Bottom: Mrs. John Volpe in- 
spects "before" photographs at 
dedication ceremony with Mrs. 
George Bailey, Jr., President of 
the Beautification Committee, and 
Dr. Merle L. Howes, Foundation 
Advisor and Head of 4-H and 
Youth Work, University of Mas- 
sachusetts. 

Page 3 

The Society recognizes Mrs. 
Lyndon B. Johnson's achievements 
in making the people of the nation 
aware of their surroundings by 
presenting her with the Society's 
Large Gold Medal. Mrs. Claiborne 
Pell, wife of the Senator from 
Rhode Island, received the medal 
from President Wolcott at the 1966 
New England Spring Flower Show. 
With them are Mrs. John Volpe 
and Carlton B. Lees. 






2dL 






Top row, left to right: One of several rich decorations 
of nuts, cones, gourds and pods, which were especially 
designed for the Lecture Hall columns for the 1966 
Christmas Show, staged in co-operation with The Garden 
Club Federation of Massachusetts, Inc. 

The horticulture section of the same show with wreaths, 
many kinds of green materials and other Christmas plants 
on display. 

Jay Stinson, Co-ordinator of Education for the Society, 
greets Mrs. George Wallace of Fitch burg who arrived at 
the 1966 Spring Show by helicopter. Mrs. Wallace is 
receiving a bouquet of daisies in Uncle Saiti's top hat, the 
symbol for the Show. 

Mrs. Theodore Commos of Cohasset inspects Bonsai 
Chrysanthemums at the 1966 Fall Show. 

Bottom row, left to right: The temptation of bright 
apples is always great for children at the Fall Show. 

Putting together the Spring Show is hard work but, 
obviously, also has humorous tnoments for these members 
of the Women's Exhibition Committee. 

Page 5 

Top: The Annual Rose Show, in co-operation with the 
New England Rose Society, helps many members and 
other visitors to decide on varieties for their own garden. 

Bottom: Everyone is a potential rose grower. 



PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

continued from page 3 

pose and program of the Society. This re-examina- 
tion came about because of the need to decide 
about the future of Horticultural Hall because of 
major developments in our neighborhood. Conse- 
quently, we found that we could not separate build- 
ing from program or program from building. 

Members of the Board of Trustees met with of- 
ficials from the University of Massachusetts, the 
Christian Science Mother Church (which is mainly 
responsible for the redevelopment of our neighbor- 
hood), the Boston Redevelopment Authority and 
with realtors and architects to examine every facet 
of the building and the program. In September 
1966 the newly-formed Planning Committee sub- 
mitted a report to the Trustees. The report recog- 
nized the increasing need both for the influence of 
the Society and for the role of horticulture in the 
growing urbanization of our country. The Planning 
Committee report made four basic points: 

1. "that the Society recognize and give new em- 
phasis to the role of horticulture in the crea- 
tion and conservation of human environment 
. . . and become a more important influence 
for improving the quality of the environment. 

2. "that the Society take the leadership in funda- 
mental programs and activities Which con- 
tribute to the overall advancement of horti- 
culture. 

3. "that the Society make every possible effort 
to establish, or cause to be established, ap- 
propriate information/meeting/class/demon- 
stration centers, on its own or in co-operation 
with appropriate organizations and/or insti- 
tutions, throughout the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. 

4. "that the Society make every effort to estab- 
lish a conservatory gallery for the display of 
living plants and related artifacts and 



products, at all times, to demonstrate the in- 
terdependence of man and plants." 

It was tentatively agreed that the Society could 
best achieve these goals by retaining Horticultural 
Hall. However, it is recognized that eventually we 
will be required to raise funds so that we can ex- 
pand our program as outlined and adapt the Hall 
to the needs of our future environment and our ex- 
panded role in horticulture and allied fields. 

As we look to the future, there are many prob- 
lems which need to be solved. We need more mem- 
bers and we need greater participation by members 
in the affairs of the Society. We must provide more 
and better services to members and to the com- 
munity at large. Above all we must think of the 
future in terms of the ever-increasing need to 
achieve the goals for which the Massachusetts Hor- 
ticultural Society was founded. 

Oliver F. Ames, Acting President 



In view of the many substantial steps taken 
by the Board of Trustees to carry to comple- 
tion the program which began with the edito- 
rial and design changes of HORTICULTURE 
in 1964, the Executive Committee (as re- 
ported above) engaged the services of a pub- 
lications expert. His report was completed 
on August 1, 1967. It confirms in general 
the judgment and actions of the Board and 
makes constructive recommendations for the 
future in which HORTICULTURE should 
become self-sustaining and be an even more 
substantial voice for the Society. 

Any member of the Society wishing to re- 
ceive a copy of this ten-page report may ob- 
tain one by writing to the Executive Secretary. 
John O. Stubbs, Chairman 
Publications Committee 




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FLOWER SHOW AWARDS 1965 

THE PRESIDENT'S CUP 
Bartlett Gardens, Hamilton, for a roof garden, the 
most meritorious exhibit in the Spring Show. 

GOLD MEDAL OF THE 
HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY OF NEW YORK 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society Women's Ex- 
hibition Committee, Mrs. John M. Hall, Mrs. Richard 
Walcott, Co-Chairmen, for a group of ten gardens, the 
most beautiful exhibit in the Spring Show. 

THE GOLD MEDAL CERTIFICATE OF THE 
PENNSYLVANIA HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society Women's Ex- 
hibition Committee, for ten small gardens, an exhibit of 
special merit which stimulates an interest in horticulture, 
at the Spring Show. 

THE ALBERT C. BURRAGE GOLD VASE 
Bartlett Gardens, Hamilton, for a roof garden, the most 
outstanding exhibit during the year 1965. 

GOLD MEDAL OF THE 
PHILADELPHIA FLOWER SHOW, INC. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, Marion, for a group 
of acacias, at the Spring Show. 

BEACON HILL GARDEN CLUB CUP 

Wellesley Garden Club (Mrs. Horace G. Crockett, Jr., 
Chairman) for the most charming garden club exhibit in 
the Spring Show. 

MRS. JOHN S. AMES CUP 
Hamilton-Wenham Garden Club (Mrs. Harold F. 
Bloss, Jr., Chairman), for the exhibit in the Garden Club 
Section displaying the greatest horticultural excellence at 
the Spring Show. 

THE ANTOINE LEUTHY PRIZE 
Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, Chestnut Hill, for a group of 
orchid plants, the best display of flowering and foliage 
plants in the Spring Show. 

TROPHY OF THE MASSACHUSETTS 
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

Weston Nuseries, Inc., Hopkinton, for an informal gar- 
den at the Spring Show. 

BULKLEY MEDAL OF THE 
GARDEN CLUB OF AMERICA 
The Massachusetts Horticultural Society Women's Ex- 
hibition Committee, for ten small gardens, an exhibit of 
special merit at the Spring Show. 



THE BEATRIX FARRAND SILVER BOWL 

William A. Coolidge, Topsfield, for a southern azalea 
garden, the best exhibit of azaleas in the Spring Show. 

JOHN TAYLOR ARMS AWARD 
Mrs. Richard D. Roquemore, West Newton Garden 
Club, for the blue ribbon entry receiving the highest 
number of points at the Spring Show. 

THE MRS. EDWIN SIBLEY WEBSTER CUP 
Hamilton-Wenham Garden Club (Mrs. Harold F. 
Bloss, Jr., Chairman), for a garden in a wooded area in 
back of a contemporary home. 

WONDERLAND CUP 

Alexander I. Heimlich, Woburn, for a waterfall gar- 
den, for the largest number of votes from the Spring 
Show visitors. 

BEST BLOOMS 

Camellia, Lady Mary Cromet, exhibited by Mrs. Ed- 
win S. Webster, Chestnut Hill. Daffodil, Revelry, ex- 
hibited by Rev. J. B. Shannon, Westport Point. Tulip, 
Fulton, exhibited by the First Church of Christ, Scientist, 
Boston. Iris seedling, Border Iris, 44-AA, exhibited by 
Mrs. Miriam E. Corey, Reading. Iris specimen, High 
Seas, exhibited by Mrs. Irving W. Fraim, Waltham. 

GOLD MEDALS 

Bartlett Gardens, for a roof garden at the Spring Show. 

Boston School Garden at Woburn, for the best display 
of vegetables and flowers from a school garden. 

Carter's Cactus & House Plant Center, for a cactus 
and succulent exhibit at the Spring Show. 

William A. Coolidge, for a southern azalea garden at 
the Spring Show. 

DeVincent Farms, for a spring garden at the Spring 
Show. 

DeVincent Farms, for a roadside stand. 

Leo J. Dutram, for a jungle theme featuring cymbi- 
dium orchids and tropical plants at the Spring Show. 

Flowers by Tedesco, for a display of miscellaneous cut 
flowers at the Spring Show. 

The Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts, Inc., 
Mrs. Walter A. Galloway, Chairman, for flower arrange- 
ments based on the theme "Decorating for Beauty" at 
the Spring Show. 

The Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts, Inc., 
Mrs. Robert G. Richards, Chairman, for flower arrange- 
ments based on the theme "New England Heritage." 

The Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts, Inc., 
Mrs. C. Norman Collard, Chairman, for flower arrange- 
ments based on the theme "Come Share With Us." 



Ormond Hamilton, for islands of beauty in the sea of 
space. 

Allen C. Haskell, for a suburban type planting at the 
Spring Show. 

Alexander I. Heimlich, for a waterfall garden at the 
Spring Show. 

Alexander I. Heimlich, for a study in trees. 

Johnson Bros. Greenhouses, Inc., for a display of roses 
at the Spring Show. 

Karl P. Jones, for a display of roses. 

William F. Lommerse, for a display of tulips. 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society Women's Exhibi- 
tion Committee, for ten small gardens based on the 
theme "Town and Country Gardens" at the Spring Show. 

Helen C. Moseley, for a group of greenhouse flowering 
plants at the Spring Show. 

New England Carnation Growers Assoc, Inc., for a 
display of carnations at the Spring Show. 

New England Vegetable Growers Assoc, Inc., for a 
display of vegetables. 

Old Colony Landscape Service, Inc., for an informal 
garden retreat at the Spring Show. 

Park Florist, for an oriental autumn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, for a group of acacias 
at the Spring Show. 

Marinus Vander Pol, for a clematis garden at the Spring 
Show. 

Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, for a group of orchid plants 
at the Spring Show. 

Wellesley College, for an educational exhibit at the 
Spring Show. 

Weston Nurseries, Inc., for an informal garden at the 
Spring Show. 

Weston Nurseries, Inc., for a dooryard garden. 

SILVER MEDALS 

American Begonia Society, Bessie Raymond Buxton 
Branch, for a pot garden of begonias at the Spring Show. 

American Gloxinia Society, New England Chapter, for 
an educational exhibit at the Spring Show. 

Associated Fruit Growers of Eastern Massachusetts, 
for a display of "Apples for Health." 

Jay M. Berkson Landscaping Company, for a town 
house garden at the Spring Show. 

Bonsai Study Group of the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society, for a bonsai gallery. 

W. Dexter Brownell, Jr., for a rose garden at the Spring 
Show. 



Butler & Ullman, Inc., for a display of camellias. 

F. I. Carter & Sons, for flowering and foliage plants at 
the Spring Show. 

James R. Cass, for a display of garden roses. 

Cider Hill Greenhouses, for a group of saintpaulias at 
the Spring Show. 

William A. Coolidge, for 12 cyclamen plants. 

Gardner Museum, for a display of camellias at the 
Spring Show. 

Gardner Museum, for a group of Christmas cactus. 

Gardner Museum, for an azalea garden at the Spring 
Show. 

Jamaica Plain High School, for an informal garden 
at the Spring Show. 

Mahoney's Rocky Ledge Farm & Nursery, for a dis- 
play of miscellaneous cut flowers at the Spring Show. 

National Association of Gardeners (Newport, Rhode 
Island Branch), for a garden featuring rhododendrons & 
azaleas at the Spring Show. 

Norfolk County Agricultural High School, for an in- 
formal garden at the Spring Show. 

North Shore Horticultural Society, for a chapel in the 
woods at the Spring Show. 

Clifford A. Packard, for an informal backyard garden 
at the Spring Show. 

Peirce Bros., Inc., for a display of roses. 

Dr. Harry E. Raymond, for a display of hybrid teas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, for a group of orchids. 

Jean Thibodeau, for a collection of miniature bulbs at 
the Spring Show. 

BRONZE MEDALS 

Brockton School Garden, for a display of flowers and 
vegetables from a school garden. 

The Garden Shed, for a small backyard garden at the 
Spring Show. 

Gardeners' & Florists' Club of Boston, for an informal 
in town patio at the Spring Show. 

The Junior League of Boston, Inc., for a display of 
flowers and vegetables. 

Junior's Plant Shop, for a display of dried material. 

Mahoney's Rocky Ledge Farm & Nursery, for a for- 
mal geranium garden at the Spring Show. 

Mahoney's Rocky Ledge Farm & Nursery, for a garden 
of allure. 

Norfolk County Agricultural High School, for a 
chrysanthemum garden. 

Mrs. Thomas T. Tatterfield, for a display of all Am- 
erican rose selections. 



CULTURAL CERTIFICATES 

Herbert Branch, for a tropical garden at the Spring 
Show. 

Carter's Cactus & House Plant Center, for an educa- 
tional exhibit of cacti and succulent at the Spring Show. 

Albert A. Hulley, for an exhibition of hybrid clematis 
with new seedling varieties at the Spring Show. 

Kartuz Greenhouses, for a group of gesneriads at the 
Spring Show. 

EDUCATIONAL CERTIFICATES 

American Gloxinia Society, New England Chapter, for 
an educational exhibit at the Spring Show. 

Bonsai Study Group of the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society, for a bonsai gallery. 

Essex Agricultural & Technical Institute, for seasonal 
cut flower arrangements at the Spring Show. 

Jean Thibodeau, for a collection of miniature bulbs at 
the Spring Show. 

Wellesley College, for an educational exhibit at the 
Spring Show. 

Walter A. Wheeler, Jr., for a display of "Camellias 
from Seed." 

AWARDS OF MERIT 

Rose John F. Kennedy, exhibited by Jackson & Perkins. 

Carnation La Reve, exhibited by the New England 
Carnation Growers Association at the Spring Show. 

VOTES OF COMMENDATION 

Cymbidium Bengal Bay, variety Ann Dutram, ex- 
hibited by Leo J. Dutram at the Spring Show. 

Rhododendron Hybrid Group #36, exhibited by Weston 
Nurseries, Inc. 

BEST COMMERCIAL BOOTH IN THE 
SPRING SHOW 
Kartuz Greenhouse, Wilmington. 



FLOWER SHOW AWARDS 1966 

THE PRESIDENT'S CUP 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, Marion, for an out- 
standing forest of acacias, the most meritorious exhibit 
in the Spring Show. 

GOLD MEDAL OF THE 
HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY OF NEW YORK 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, Marion, for an out- 
standing forest of acacias, the most beautiful exhibit in 
the Spring Show. 



THE GOLD MEDAL CERTIFICATE OF THE 
PENNSYLVANIA HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

The New England Wild Flower Preservation Society, 
for their superior presentation of Trillium habitats, an 
exhibit of special merit which stimulates an interest in 
horticulture at the Spring Show. 

THE ALBERT C. BURRAGE GOLD VASE 
Allen C. Haskell, New Bedford, for a contemporary 
garden, the most outstanding exhibit during the year 1966. 

GOLD MEDAL OF THE 
PHILADELPHIA FLOWER SHOW, INC. 

Honolulu Botanic Gardens and the East-West Center 
for Flora Pacifica, at the Spring Show. 

BEACON HILL GARDEN CLUB CUP 

Garden Club of Buzzards Bay (Mrs. John C. Bullard, 
Chairman), for the most charming garden club exhibit 
in the Spring Show. 

MRS. JOHN S. AMES CUP 
Garden Club of Buzzards Bay (Mrs. John C. Bullard, 
Chairman), for a small garden featuring a pool and flow- 
ering trees, an exhibit in the Garden Club Section display- 
ing the greatest horticultural excellence at the Spring Show. 

THE ANTOINE LEUTHY PRIZE 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, Marion, for an outstand- 
ing forest of acacias, the best display of flowering and 
foliage plants at the Spring Show. 

TROPHY OF THE MASSACHUSETTS 
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

Weston Nurseries, Inc., Hopkinton, for an outstanding 
New England garden at the Spring Show. 

BULKLEY MEDAL OF THE 
GARDEN CLUB OF AMERICA 

The Honolulu Botanic Gardens and the East-West Cen- 
ter, for Flora Pacifica, an exhibit of special merit at the 
Spring Show. 

THE BEATRIX FARRAND SILVER BOWL 
Gardner Museum, Boston, for a group of azaleas, the 
best exhibit of azaleas in the Spring Show. 

JOHN TAYLOR ARMS AWARD 

Mrs. Donald E. Dupee, the Garden Club of Hingham, 
for the blue ribbon entry receiving the highest number of 
points at the Spring Show. 

THE MRS. EDWIN SIBLEY WEBSTER CUP 

Topsfield Garden Club (Mrs. Donald F. Underhill, 
Chairman), for a small garden featuring a bird feeder. 

continued on page 8 



FLOWER SHOP AWARDS 

continued from page 7 

WONDERLAND CUP 

Mahoney's Rocky Ledge Farm and Nursery, Winchester, 
for a tropical garden, receiving the largest number of 
votes from the Spring Show visitors. 

GOLD MEDALS 

Amateur Horticultural Classes of the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society (Mrs. Richard M. Burnes, Chair- 
man), for significant achievement at the Spring Show. 

Associated Fruit Growers of Eastern Massachusetts, for 
a display of apples. 

Jay M. Berkson Landscaping Inc., for a wall garden at 
the Spring Show. 

Carter's Cactus & House Plant Center, for an outstand- 
ing cactus garden at the Spring Show. 

William A. Coolidge, for an Atrium garden at the 
Spring Show. 

Jack Davis Florist, for outstanding floral arrangements 
at the Spring Show. 

DeVincent Farms, for a terrace garden at the Spring 
Show. 

DeVincent Farms, for two mass chrysanthemum plant- 
ings. 

Leo J. Dutram, for a garden of orchids at the Spring 
Show. 

The Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts, Inc. 
(Mrs. Donald L. Stevens, Chairman) for significant 
achievement in competitive flower arrangements at the 
Spring Show. 

The Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts, Inc. 
(Mrs. Robert G. Richards, Chairman) for flower paint- 
ings. 

The Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts, Inc. 
(Mrs. Louis F. Freitas, Chairman) for "Sights and Sounds 
of Autumn." 

The Garden Shed, for a Japanese garden at the Spring 
Show. 

Gardner Museum, for a group of azaleas at the Spring 
Show. 

Gardner Museum, for a group of English winter-flower- 
ing begonias. 

Allen C. Haskell, for an outstanding contemporary gar- 
den at the Spring Show. 

Alexander I. Heimlich, for a country front yard garden 
at the Spring Show. 

Alexander I. Heimlich, for a series of small gardens. 

Honolulu Botanic Gardens and East-West Center, for 
Flora Pacifica at the Spring Show. 



Mrs. Daniel E. Huger, for a patio garden, Spring Show. 

Ikebana International, Boston Chapter 17, for their 
flower arrangements. 

Karl P. Jones, for an educational display of roses. 

Mahoney's Rocky Ledge Farm and Nursery, for a 
tropical garden at the Spring Show. 

New England Carnation Growers Association, Inc., for 
an outstanding display of carnations at the Spring Show. 

New England Vegetable Growers Association, for a 
display of vegetables. 

Norfolk County Agricultural High School, for a garden 
featuring chrysanthemums. 

Old Colony Landscape Service Inc., for an outstanding 
front yard garden at the Spring Show. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, for a group of cypripe- 
diums. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, for an outstanding for- 
est of acacias at the Spring Show. 

Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, for a display of orchids at the 
Spring Show. 

Weston Nurseries, Inc., for an outstanding New En- 
gland Garden at the Spring Show. 

Weston Nurseries, Inc., for plantings around a patio. 

The Women's Exhibition Committee of the Mas- 
sachusetts Horticultural Society (Mrs. Eugene C. Eppin- 
ger, Chairman) for 11 gardens by amateurs at the Spring 
Show. 

SILVER MEDALS 
James R. Cass, for the display of climbers. 
D'Errico-McGlynn Flowers, for floral arrangements 
at the Spring Show. 

Designs Unlimited, for floral arrangements, Spring Show. 
Gardner Museum, for a group of Christmas cactus. 
Gardner Museum, for chrysanthemum plants. 
Karl P. Jones, for a display of fragrant floribundas. 
Junior's Plant Shop, for a display of dried material. 
Mrs. Francis P. Sears, for a display of camellia plants. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, for a group of orchids. 

BRONZE MEDALS 

Handy Greenhouses, for a display of house plants. 
Kartuz Greenhouses, for flowering and foliage plants. 
National Association of Gardeners (Cape Cod Branch), 
for a spring bulb garden at the Spring Show. 

CULTURAL CERTIFICATES 

Herbert Branch, for a display of orchids, Spring Show. 
Leo J. Dutram, for cymbidium Prince Charles at the 
Spring Show. 



John J. Hurley, for hydrangeas, azaleas and other 
plants at the Spring Show. 

William J. Jennings, for the collection of ferns at the 
Spring Show. 

Karl P. Jones, for a display of old garden roses. 
Karl P. Jones, for a display of fragrant hybird teas. 
George J. Jung, for a display of garden roses. 
George J. Jung, for a display of hybrid teas. 
Mrs. Harry E. Raymond, for a display of garden roses. 
John Sullivan, for cascade chrysanthemum plants. 
Mrs. Eva M. Tatterfield, for a display of All American 
Rose Selections. 

EDUCATIONAL CERTIFICATES 

Bonsai Study Group of the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society, for a display of trained chrysanthemums. 

Alexander I. Heimlich, for a series of small gardens. 

New England Wild Flower Preservation Society (Mrs. 
Garrett Birkhoff, Chairman) for the superior presentation 
of Trillium habitats at the Spring Show. 

Jean Thibodeau, for the border of miniature bulbs at 
the Spring Show. 

Wellesley College, for the collection of ferns at the 
Spring Show. 

VOTES OF COMMENDATION 

Geranium Patricia Andrea, exhibited by Andrea Green- 
houses, at the Spring Show. 

Bonsai, exhibited by the Bonsai Study Group of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society at the Spring Show. 

VOTES OF THANKS 

Norman E. Dupee, Jr., for a display of Ornithogalum 
saundersaiae. 

Mrs. Robert Moore, for a display of gourd craft. 

BEST COMMERCIAL BOOTH IN THE 
SPRING SHOW 
Mahoney's Rocky Ledge Farm and Nursery, Winchester. 

SPECIAL CREATIVITY AWARD 

Mrs. Robert Lange, Andover Garden Club, for blue 
ribbon flower arrangement receiving 95 or higher at the 
Spring Show. 

Mrs. Donald E. Dupee, Garden Club of Hingham, for 
blue ribbon flower arrangement receiving 95 or higher at 
the Spring Show. 

MARIE HANCOCK COOK 
CERTIFICATE OF MERIT 
Mrs. Howard Hunter, Arlington Garden Club, for the 
highest scoring blue ribbon arrangement in a traditional 
class at the Spring Show. 

Milford Lawrence, Chairman 



SPECIAL MEDALS 1965 

GEORGE ROBERT WHITE MEDAL OF HONOR 

Ethel Zoe Bailey, Bailey Hortorum, Cornell University, 
Ithaca, New York, for a lifetime of study and service to 
Botany and Horticulture. Scientist, traveller, author and 
friend, her wide-ranging studies have done much to help 
others throughout the world better appreciate the plants 
round about them. 

THE THOMAS ROLAND MEDAL 

Clarence Edwin Godshalk, Morton Arboretum, Lisle, 
Illinois for his meritorious work in the planning and de- 
velopment of the Morton Arboretum, and for his direction 
and leadership since its founding, making it the beauti- 
ful display garden it is today. 

IACKSON DAWSON MEDAL 

Alfred lames Fordham, Arnold Arboretum, Jamaica 
Plain who, following in the footsteps of famous propaga- 
tors at the Arnold Arboretum, is doing much to maintain 
the high standards set by them years ago in this often 
difficult and sometimes most perplexing art. 

LARGE GOLD MEDAL 

Louise Bush-Brown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for her 
eminent horticultural accomplishments as teacher and 
author, and especially for her efforts in founding the 
Neighborhood Garden Association and taking an active 
part in its development and organization, which has done 
so much to help the underprivileged better appreciate 
the beauty of Nature. 

LARGE GOLD MEDAL 

Claudia Taylor Johnson, The White House, Washing- 
ton, D.C. for her willingness to use her high position and 
her leadership in focusing the attention of the entire na- 
tion on the serious need for energetic activity in the 
beautification of the American landscape. (Presentation 
of the medal was made to Mrs. Johnson's representative, 
Mrs. Claiborne Pell, wife of Senator Pell of Rhode Is- 
land at the New England Spring Flower Show Preview 
Reception, Wonderland Park, March 11, 1966). 

SPECIAL MEDALS 1966 

GEORGE ROBERT WHITE MEDAL OF HONOR 

Fletcher Steele, landscape architect, author, lecturer and 
tutor to client, helper and student alike, whose creative 
and cultured interest in gardens and people has left New 
England a unique heritage of his work which in its im- 
aginative quality of design, perfection of craftsmanship 
and freedom from convention are, and will continue to 
be, examples of the superlative in garden art and a source 
of joy for all. 



THE THOMAS ROLAND MEDAL 

Henry Marcellus Cathey for his meritorius work in ex- 
perimentally controlling plant growth. His findings in 
regulating the flowering process in certain plants by en- 
vironmental control and in chemical control by the use 
of growth-stimulating and growth-retarding substances, 
have resulted in valuable basic information applicable to 
the flower growing industry of America. 

JACKSON DAWSON MEDAL 

Sidney Waxman of the University of Connecticut who 
has been doing outstanding research in the propagation of 
woody plants, especially those that have proved diffi- 
cult to propagate by common methods. 

LARGE GOLD MEDAL 

Fred Carroll Sargent who has made the horticultural 
plantings in the municipal cemeteries of Salem, Mas- 
sachusetts, bringing together one of the best collections 
of woody plants in the area. He has given generously 
of his time and experience in conducting plant clinics for 
the Federated Garden Clubs of the state and for the 
Society. 

Donald Wyman, Chairman 





Ethel Zoe Bailey 



Clarence Godshalk 






President Wolcott presents the Society's Large Gold 
Medal to Mrs. Louise Bush-Brown of Philadelphia at the 
1966 Annual Meeting. 




Dr. Donald Wyman, Trustee of the Society, with Dr. 
Sidney Waxman, of the University of Connecticut, and 
Dr. Henry M. Cathey, of the U.S. Department of Agricul- 
ture, award recipients at the 1967 Annual Meeting. 





Alfred Fordham 



Claudia Taylor Johnson 



Fletcher Steele 



Fred Carroll Sargent 




Above: Mrs. G. Kennard Wakefield, a Trustee of the 
Society, with Mrs. Henry F. Cate, holding the Bronze 
Medal awarded to Mr. and Mrs. Cate's garden in Duxbury, 
at the 1967 Annual Meeting. 

Below: At the 1966 Annual Meeting President Wolcott 
presented a Cold Medal to Mrs. Douglas Crocker of 
Fitchburg for her garden. 




Below: Recipients of Garden Awards at the 1967 An- 
nual Meeting are: Mr. Lewis W. Francis of Falmouth, 
Reverend Richard Crowell (for St. Barnabas Chapel) of 
Falmouth and Mr. and Mrs. Hollis Lovell of Falmouth. 




GARDEN AWARDS 1965 

GOLD MEDALS 

Mount Auburn Cemetery, Mount Auburn Street, 
Cambridge 

"Famed Mount Auburn - one hundred and thirty 
four years of world wide selection have resulted in its 
present magnificent plantings of rare and beautiful trees 
and shrubs." 

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Crocker, Nichols Street, 
Fitchburg 

"This formal terraced garden on a severe cross slope 
was designed and developed with great ingenuity. Over 
the years, the sympathetic and knowledgable owners have 
preserved the original design and plantings while per- 
fecting the color and details. Beneath the handsome old 
standard lilacs is the freshness of borders seasonally re- 
newed; the sparkle of a fountain enlivens the long ter- 
races with their attractive seats and tubs of subtropical 
plants." 

SILVER MEDALS 

State Mutual Life Assurance Company of America, 
Lincoln Street, Worcester 

"Sweeping parklike lawns and slopes, well arranged 
masses of mature shrubs and many young specimen trees 
make a handsome setting for the building on all sides." 

Dr. and Mrs. Gaspar Angelo, Huckleberry Hill, 
Lincoln 

"The grass terrace on the living side of the house 
takes full advantage of a magnificent view over Hobbs 
Brook Basin toward the wooded hills of Waltham. The 
"hanging" gardens are cleverly adapted to a steep ledge 
providing opportunities for planting where otherwise they 
would not exist." 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Witherby, Huckleberry Hill, 
Lincoln 

"An octagonal house projects from a steep cliff in a 
woodland setting. Interesting terraces and well planted 
steps wind around the house as they descend to a uniquely 
shaped swimming pool fitted to slopes and trees. Here 
is outdoor living made easy!" 

Mr. and Mrs. Bartow Kelly, High Rock Road, Fitch- 
burg 

"Situated on a hillside overlooking extensive orchards 
and a valley view of Mount Wachuset, this old colonial 
house is well screened from the road by full grown dog- 
woods against a cedar fence. One of the attractive ter- 
races overlooks a small formal garden; another, developed 
on the site of an old barn, has become a unique and 
livable feature of the place." 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Milton, 533 Salisbury Street, 
Worcester 

"Touches of pink flowers and green leaves against a 
white woven fence enliven the small brick entrance ter- 
race of this charming house. Here too, is an espaliered 
stewartia. A series of small seasonal gardens and a 
sloping lawn lead to the little lake where huge weeping 
willows are reflected, trout abound and wild ducks feed." 

The Algonquin Gas Transmission Company, 1284 Sol- 
diers Field Road, Brighton 

"A dramatic treatment of a small courtyard so skill- 
fully designed and planted that it is ornamental by day 
and by night throughout the year providing a pleasant 
outlook for the surrounding restaurant and offices." 



BRONZE MEDALS 

Mrs. John W. Higgins, 80 William Street, Worcester 

"The handsome mature plantings and excellent basic 
structure make this a distinguished and restful city gar- 
den." 

Peabody School, 44 Linnaean Street, Cambridge 

"The City of Cambridge has made a significant effort 
toward providing an attractive horticultural setting for 
the children. The design of the interior courtyard and the 
terraces on either side of the building is notable." 



GARDEN CERTIFICATES 

Mrs. William B. Soper, Prospect Street, Fitchburg 

"Interesting results of using old house foundations for 
a garden space and sitting area with specimen dogwoods, 
oxydendrums and an ivy of unusually fine texture." 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Arms, 21 Metcalf Street, Wor- 
cester 

"An excellent example of the horticultural accomplish- 
ment of two knowledgeable gardeners who maintain their 
small place themselves." 

Mrs. Roger N. Heald, 45 Flagg Street, Worcester 

"A city garden which provides enjoyment to friends and 
neighbors and the casual passerby. It features annuals and 
a white garden." 

Worcester Federal Savings and Loan Association, 22 
Elm Street, Worcester 

"An oasis in a busy downtown district - a well planted 
parking space bordered by a succession of flowers from 
spring to fall." 

continued on page 11 



GARDEN AWARDS 1965 

continued from page 10 

Paul Revere Life Insurance Company, 18 Chestnut 
Street, Worcester. 

"A long narrow strip of land, bordering a congested 
city street and backed by a concrete wall, has been trans- 
formed into a noteworthy one by its imaginative plants 
of crabapples, firethorns, azaleas and a succession of 
flowers." 

GARDEN AWARDS 1966 

GOLD MEDAL 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, Oyster Harbors, Osterville 
A seashore estate of great distinction. The restraint 
shown in making the design was equaled by the quality 
of the subtle and unusual treatment of its elements. 

SILVER MEDALS 

The garden of St. Barnabas Chapel, Falmouth (Rev- 
erend Richard Crowell) 

This small ecclesiastical garden is both ornamental and 
useful. Its well head and panels of turf and paving, may 
be used for christenings and weddings; its borders are 
both evergreen and flowering. The double row of Japan- 
ese cherries filter the sun on the windows and so shelter 
the long interior flower border of the children's Chapel 
which is maintained in bloom throughout the winter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred C. Frick, Main Street, Cotuit 

From the entrance garden, brimming with flowers, to 
the top of the bank overlooking Cotuit Bay, this little 
place is expertly planted and exquisitely maintained. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hollis Lovell, Oyster Pond, The Moors, 
Falmouth 

The enthusiasm of the owners and their successful ef- 
forts at experimenting with a wide variety of plants, from 
the trial plantings in the back to the thyme covered ter- 
race overlooking a small man made beach, has resulted 
in a place of great horticultural interest. 

BRONZE MEDALS 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry F. Cate, 137 South Station Street, 
Duxbury 

A gray shingled house in a woodland setting has small, 
livable gardens and sitting areas. Its oak and pine shaded 
lawn slopes to a new pond already abounding in wild 
ducks and geese. 

Mr. and Mrs. John B. Welch, Gansett, Woods Hole 

A series of individual, well related and carefully planted 
garden areas which takes full advantage of the varying 



topography and the rather strong natural growth. Some 
are secluded, while others have long vistas of Quisset Har- 
bor. 

GARDEN CERTIFICATE 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred B. Manchee, Lake Elizabeth Drive, 
Craigville Beach 

Despite the terrific exposure to high winds and the un- 
happy foreground of neighboring buildings; in only a few 
years this small place has developed an enclosed flower 
garden with intermediate terrace and a secluded lawn 
with a view of Nantucket Sound. 

SPECIAL CERTIFICATE 

Mr. Lewis W. Francis, 497 Sippewissett Road, Quis- 
sett, Falmouth 

A collection of many varieties of old and thriving box- 
wood. Nearby is a bearing chestnut tree, crepe myrtles 
that bloom and a magnificent specimen of metasequoia 
grown from one of the "original" seeds from China. 

ALBERT C. BURRAGE PORCH PRIZE 
Mr. and Mrs. William F. Bickel, Ice Valley Road, 
Osterville 

A large stone flagged terrace, planted with masses of 
gray and green groundcovers, forms a charming outlook 
for the living rooms of the house and affords a spectacular 
view over unspoiled native landscape to inlets and salt 
river. 

Mrs. G. Kennard Wakefield, Chairman 



Collection of plants entered by Mrs. George F. Hoysradt, 
Belmont Garden Club, at the 1966 Christmas Show. 





OLIVER WOLCOTT 

In recognition of the ten years of service and leadership 
as President of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, 
the Board of Trustees wishes to express its sense of loss 
in the death of Mr. Oliver Wolcott and its sincere appre- 
ciation of his services as a member and officer of the 
Society. 

Son of Roger Wolcott (Governor of Massachusetts 
from 1897-1900) Mr. Wolcott was long interested in horti- 
culture and the various activities of the Society. A gradu- 
ate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School (1915) 
he served in the U.S. Army in World War I. He served 
in the law firm of Ropes, Gray, Boyden and Perkins be- 
fore joining the Old Colony Trust Company of Boston 
in 1925 and retired in 1956 as its counsel Vice President. 

He was greatly admired by his neighbors and asso- 
ciates, serving as Town Moderator in Hamilton for 30 
years. Trustee of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, former 
President of the Boston Council, Boy Scouts of America 
and active as a trustee and volunteer in the Peabody 
Museum of Salem, his activities were distributed among 
several outstanding philanthropic organizations. It was 
horticulture and the growing and display of plants as 
well as the several activities of the Massachusetts Horti- 
cultural Society in which our interests mingled with his, 
and his guidance and dignified leadership during his ten- 
ure of office as President, will be greatly missed. 

Be it therefore resolved, that this expression of appre- 
ciation be sent to Mrs. Oliver Wolcott, and be spread 
upon the minutes of this meeting of the Board of Trus- 
tees, Massachusetts Horticultural Society. 

May 25, 1967 



11 



TREASURER'S REPORT 1965 

The Society experienced a loss from operations 
during 1965 of $154,775.87 compared with 
$182,220.98 in 1964. The Spring Flower Show 
profit of $33,027.54 compared to $17,104.52 of 
the previous year and HORTICULTURE showed 
a loss of $118,629.53 as against $118,124.52 in 
1964. These figures are subject to auditors ad- 
justments and verification. 

The loss for 1965, as in the past, made it neces- 
sary to sell some of our securities, but I am happy 
to report that the income from securities in 1965 
was larger than that of the previous year. 

While we have budgeted another loss for 1966, 
plans for the future will change this long down- 
ward trend within the next three years, we are sure. 



TREASURER'S REPORT 1966 

For 1966 the Society had a loss of $466,217. 
Several factors contributed to this large deficit, 
namely : 

(1) A loss from operations of HORTICUL- 
TURE of $409,656, up $237,500 from the 
previous year. This represents over 85% 
of the Society's loss, but a substantial part 
of this was non-recurring. 

(2) A decline of $32,500 in income from the 
Spring Show, which showed a profit of only 
$576 as compared with $33,000 of the year 
before. 

Because of these factors it was necessary from 
time to time to sell securities from the endowment 
fund. This fund stood at $1,848,412 as of Decem- 
ber 31 after the above-mentioned sales. 

Frederick S. Moseley HI, Treasurer 

Any member of the Society wishing to receive an audited 
statement, may obtain one by writing to the Treasurer, 
Horticultural Hall. 



12 



BEQUESTS 

Mena V. French, $1,000 

MONEY GIFTS 

Mr. Edgar L. Acken 

Miss Mary Almy 

Mrs. H. E. Andren 

Mr. W. J. Breckenridge 

Mr. R. Burdon-Muller 

Mrs. Roger M. Burke 

Mrs. J. S. Clark 

Miss Helen P. Cleary 

Mr. William A. Coolidge 

Mrs. Myrick Crane 

Mr. & Mrs. R. Ammi Cutter 

Miss Jeanette DeMontigny 

Mrs. Marcy Eager 

Mr. Chester O. Eilertson 

Mrs. H. P. Emory 

Mrs. Roger Ernst 

Mrs. Walter A. Forbush 

Mrs. Clement R. Ford 

Miss Anne P. Halliday 

Mrs. Herbert C. Harris 

Mr. R. M. Heer 

Mr. Henry S. Howe 

Mrs. Weston Howland 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard L. Katzenstein 

Miss Alia A. Libbey 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael J. Lielasus 

Mr. A. A. Lilienfeld 

Mrs. Kenneth D. MacColl 

Mr. Leo B. Moore 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry A. Morss, Jr. 

Mrs. Constantin A. Pertzoff 

Mrs. George Putnam 

Mrs. Arthur C. Ruge 

Mrs. Otis T. Russell 

Mrs. Philip G. Rust 

Mr. George L. Sanborn 

Mrs. P. D. Sherman 

Mrs. Charles P. Smith 

Mr. & Mrs. Franklin H. Smith 

Mrs. Lamar Soutter 

Mrs. Homer N. Sweet 

Miss Ruth Tucker 

Mrs. Robert K. Vincent 

Miss Harriet P. Wasserboehr 

Miss Mary S. Watkins 

Mrs. Robinson S. Whitten 

Mr. Nathaniel Whittier 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter Wright 

Mrs. Cyril Wynne 

Miss Sibylla O. Young 

Rockport Garden Club 



LIBRARY REPORT 

William Endicott in his report on the library 
(Transactions, 1892, p. 174) tells of its character 
and value. It is a glowing report of treasures 
acquired with the Stickney bequest and funds sup- 
plied by the Society. 

Seventy-five years later, in the third Horti- 
cultural Hall, the character of the collection has 
branched out to cover all aspects of horticulture 
and has increased in value, not only monetarily, 
but in use. 

Statistics show that the library has been used 
by the public and by our members to acquire a 
wider philosophy of gardening and a greater com- 
petence in horticultural skills. 

Records also show that the library has reached 
out, taking advantage of the latest communication 
techniques, in an ever expanding service to other 
libraries, research institutions, schools and botanic 
gardens. 

Of special interest is the publication of the Sup- 
plement to the Dictionary Catalog of the Library 
of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. Com- 
piled by Elizabeth Higgins, this work lists by sub- 
ject the works added to the library in the past five 
years. It also lists the donors of books. These 
gifts have greatly helped augment the book funds 
bequeathed to the library in the early part of the 
century. 

A high point of the 1966-1967 program was 
the seminar on Great Books in Horticulture ar- 
ranged by Carlton B. Lees, executive secretary, 
and Dorothy S. Manks, librarian emerita. This 
brought to the library eight of the country's leading 
lecturers in the field. 

A book fund has been established in memory 
of Marion B. Crowell, chief of circulation, who 
died in 1967. More than fifty friends and mem- 
bers have contributed to the fund which has been 

continued on page 13 



used to add the following titles: 

Barham, Henry. Hortus Americanus, 1794. 

Baskin, Esther. The Poppy and Other Deadly Plants, 1967. 

Gronovius, Johann Frederick. Flora Virginica, 1743. 

Hemsley, W. Botting. Biologia Centrali-Americana, 5 

vols., 1886-1888. 
Hinds, Richard Brinsley. The Botany of the Voyage 

H.M.S. Sulphur with botanical descriptions by George 

Bentham, 6 vols., 1844. 
Humbolt, Alexander. Monographic des melastromacees 

(Voyage de Humbolt et Bonpland 6e pt., Botanique 2) 

1816. 

On order for this memorial collection is Captain 
Cooks' Florilegium to be published in 1968 by 
the Lion and Unicorn Press of London. 

The library is also adding to the collection the 
multi-volume set of the Wild Flowers of the United 
States by Harold Rickett, not with the memorial 
fund but with an appreciation fund started with 
spontaneous contributions from all over the coun- 
try. This started during Miss Crowell's regime at 
the front desk in appreciation of the assistance 
given by the library through the loan of books and 
other material. The fund is sufficient to purchase 
the complete series and the first two volumes issued 
are now in circulation. 

Mrs. G. Kennard' Wakefield, Chairman 
BOOK DONORS 1965-1966 
Alden, John 

American Orchid Society 
Ames, Oakes I. 
Anderson, Dr. Edgar 
Ball, George J., Inc. 
Bartholomew, Mrs. John A. 
Brydon, P. H. 
Caldwell, Dorothy W. 
Cavaccini, Daniel 

Connecticut Agriculture Experiment Station, New Haven 
Cook, Mildred E. 
Coon, Nelson 
Crocker, Mrs. Frank W. 
Crossman, Mrs. Muriel C. 
Crothers, Miss Katharine 
Crowell, Miss Marion B. 
Denver Botanic Gardens 
Eaton, Mrs. Gertrude S. 
Evans, Harry 

The Garden Club Federation of Mass. Inc. 
Grullemans, Mrs. J. J. 



Guardabassi, Countess Rosalind Wood. 

Hackett, Mrs. Joseph A. 

Hedden, Ruth G. 

The Herb Society of America 

Ikebana International, Boston Chapter 

Jewett, Kenneth E. 

Lamb, Rosamond 

Lees, Carlton B. 

Lothrop, C. H. 

Lowrance, E. G. 

Lund, Muriel 

Manks, Dorothy S. 

Monnier, Mrs. Leon E. 

National Rose Society (Gt. Britain) 

National Wild Flower Society 

Nerken, Albert 

New England Gladiolus Society, Inc. 

Olmsted Associates 

Pausch, Arthur B. 

Philbrick, John H. 

Rittner, Carl & Eunice 

Schwarten, Mrs. Lazella 

Societe royale de botanique de belgique 

Stone, Mrs. Robert Gregg 

Taylor, Mrs. Frank 

Trowbridge, Mrs. Eleanor 

Turtle, Mary L. 

Wakefield, Mrs. G. Kennard 

Warner, Mrs. Roger S. 

Watson, Mrs. George H. 

Wilhelm, Stephen 

Wolf, Mrs. Leo E. 

Wood, Joanna M. 




MEMBERSHIP REPORT 

At the close of 1966 membership was as follows: 

Patrons 16 

Life Members 770 
Annual Members 

Sustaining 9 

Contributing 66 

Family 529 

Individual 5,692 

Although the total membership (7,082) shows 
a reduction of 307 during the year, membership 
income was $3,244.59 more than for 1965 ($32,- 
844.25 for 1966 as compared to $29,597.66 for 
1965). This was due to the fact that many Indi- 
vidual Members became Family, Contributing or 
Sustaining Members. 



The Spring Flower Show "Hot Line" connects directly 
with the library and allows hundreds of individuals to 
obtain substantial horticultural information. 



The Board of Trustees, after long and careful con- 
sideration, voted at the June 1967 meeting to increase 
dues from $8.00 to $10.00 for Individual Membership 
and from $12.00 to $15.00 for Family Membership, 
effective September 1, 1967. All members receive the 
magazine HORTICULTURE without further cost as 
a part of their membership. 

It has been ten years since an increase in dues. 
During this time the cost of membership mailings, 
of books for the library, and of nearly everything else 
has increased tremendously. It was apparent that the 
Society could not continue to function on an out-of- 
date dues structure. 

The Society is working hard to provide new services 
to members and to the community at large and is 
becoming increasingly influential in national as well as 
local efforts to conserve and create better environ- 
ments for tomorrow. 

In an effort to improve service to you as well as to 
make our billing more efficient, it was also voted to 
have all memberships expire on May 31 of each year. 
Each member will receive a renewal notice adjusted 
to the new dues schedule. 

Your support as a member is needed to carry our 
important work forward. 

Mrs. Charles F. Hovey, Membership Chairman 



13 



PATRONS 

Mrs. John S. Ames, North Easton 
Mrs. Edgar W. Cottle, Harvard 
Mrs. William C. Cox, Cohasset 
Mrs. W. Sidney Felton, Prides Crossing 
Mrs. Irving W. Fraim, Waltham 
Mr. G. Peabody Gardner, Brookline 
Mrs. John M. Hall, Chestnut Hill 
Mrs. Chester B. Humphrey, Boston 
Mr. Karl P. Jones, Barrington, R. I. 
Mr. Harold W. Knowlton, Auhurndale 
Mr. Peter J. Mezitt, Hopkinton 
Miss Helen C. Moseley, Newburyport 
Mrs. Alfred M. Tozzer, Cambridge 
Mrs. G. Kennard Wakefield, Milton 
Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, Chestnut Hill 



SUSTAINING MEMBERS 



Mr. William A. Coolidge 
Mrs. Samuel Hodgdon 
Mr. Simmy Jacobs 
Mrs. T. Jefferson Newbold, Sr. 
Mr. Leon E. Pearson 
Mrs. Francis P. Sears, Jr. 
Mr. Thomas E. Sears, Jr. 
Mr. Roy Garrett Watson 
Mrs. Walter W. Weld 



CONTRIBUTING MEMBERS 



Mrs. John M. Abbot 
Mr. Barrett Adams 
Mrs. Philip R. Allen 
Mrs. Oakes Ames 
Mr. Oliver Ames 
Mrs. S. B. Andrus 
Mrs. Clarence J. Arms 
Miss Dorothy B. Austin 
Mr. F. J. Bassett 



Mrs. Charles Batchelder 

Mrs. George L. Batchelder, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas P. Beal 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward L. Bigelow, Jr. 

Mrs. Rebecca C. Birdsall 

Dr. & Mrs. George T. Bottomley 

Mr. J. G. Bradley 

Dr. & Mrs. Richard Bush 

Mrs. George A. Bushee 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul C. Cabot 

Mrs. Donald F. Cameron 

Mrs. Barbara S. Chase 

Mrs. William Chisholm 

Mrs. Gertrude B. Coffin 

Mr. & Mrs. Horace W. Cole 

Miss Margaret S. Colley 

Mrs. Barton Crocker 

Mrs. Frederick J. Cummings 

Miss Margaret Curran 

Mr. Edward Dane 

Mrs. Henry F. Dauphin 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry Davis, III 

Mrs. Livingston Davis 

Mrs. Ara Derderian 

Miss Ruth Hart Eddy 

Mr. William Ferguson 

Mr. Maurice T. Freeman 

Mrs. Alexander R. George 

Mrs. Joseph W. Glidden 

Miss Gertrude B. Goldsmith 

Mrs. Robert Greenough 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert B. Harkness 

Miss Muriel S. Haynes 

Mr. Parkman D. Hoew 

Mrs. George Jeppson 

Mrs. Edward C. Johnson 

Mr. Fred E. Laisy 

Mr. & Mrs. Milford Lawrence 

Mr. & Mrs. Ernest F. Leathern 

Mrs. Charles P. Lyman 

Mrs. B. Percy Mann 

Vice Admiral & Mrs. John L. McCrea 

Mr. Henry P. McKean 

Mrs. Alexander Neilson 

Miss Mary Otis 

Mrs. Thomas Otis 

Miss Mary Parlett 

Miss Amelia Peabody 

Mrs. Sumner Pingree 

Mr. Brooks Potter 

Mr. & Mrs. George Putnam 

Mrs. Henry B. Roberts 

Miss Helen Robertson 

Mrs. George Rockwell 

Mr. George L. Sanborn 

Mrs. Fritz B. Talbot 

Mrs. E. E. Tyzzer 

Mr. & Mrs. Seth Wakeman 

Miss Cynthia Wesson 

Miss Barbara West 

Mrs. MacLean Williamson 

Mrs. John D. Young 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

Honorary Members are individuals who have received 
one of the special medals of the Massachusetts Horticul- 
tural Society. 

1942 Joseph B. Gable, Stewartstown, Pennsylvania 
Robert Moses, New York, New York 

G. G. Nearing, Ridgewood, New Jersey 
George H. Pring, St. Louis, Missouri 
Norman Taylor, New York, New York 
C. J. Van Bourgondien, Babylon, L.I., N.Y. 
Richard Wellington, Geneva, New York 

1943 Albert C. Burrage, Ipswich, Mass. 

Vincent DePetris, Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan 
Henry T. Skinner, Washington, D.C. 

1946 Mrs. John H. Cunningham, Brookline, Mass. 
Edmund F. Palmer, Vineland Station, Ontario 

1947 Thomas H. Everett, New York Botanical Garden 
James J. Hurley, Newton Highlands, Massachusetts 
Isabella Preston, Georgetown, Ontario, Canada 

1948 Stedman Buttrick, Concord, Massachusetts 

1949 A. Kenneth Simpson, Tarrytown, New York 
Harold B. Tukey, East Lansing, Michigan 

1950 Wilson Popenoe, Antigua, Guatemala 
George L. Slate, Geneva, New York 

1951 Jan De Graaff, Gresham, Oregon 

Thomas C. Desmond, Newburgh, New York 

William Hertrich, San Marino, California 

Mrs. G. Kennard Wakefield, Milton, Massachusetts 

1952 Walter E. Lammerts, Livermore, California 
Prof. Alex Laurie, Pine Mountain, Georgia 

1953 Victor A. Tiedjens, Marion, Ohio 

1954 Joseph J. Lane, Mamaroncck, New York 

1955 Paul Vossberg, Westbury, Long Island, N.Y. 
Richard P. White, Washington, D.C. 

Mrs. Irving C. Wright, Milton, Massachusetts 



14 



1956 Frank Reinelt, Capitola, California 

Mrs. Arthur P. Teele, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

1957 W. Ray Hastings, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
R. E. Kleinsorge, Silverton, Oregon 
Jacques Legendre, Wachapreague, Virginia 

1958 Mrs. Lucien B. Taylor, Dover, Massachusetts 

1959 L. C. Chadwick, Columbus, Ohio 

Arno H. Nehrling, Needham Heights, Massachusetts 
Conrad L. Wirth, Washington, D. C. 

1960 H. Harold Hume, Gainesville, Florida 
Karl Sax, Media, Pennsylvania 
Henry Teuscher, Montreal, Canada 

Henry G. Wendler, Brighton, Massachusetts 

1961 Clement Gray Bowers, Maine, New York 
Frederick Frye Rockwell, Orleans, Massachusetts 
Russell J. Seibert, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania 

1962 Raymond C. Allen, Mansfield, Ohio 
Alfred Byrd Graf, Rutherford, New Jersey 
Herbert C. Swim, Chino, California 

John Caspar Wister, Swartlimore, Pennsylvania 

1963 Mrs. Chester S. Cook, Lexington, Massachusetts 
Henry Francis du Pont, Winterthur, Delaware 
Karl P. Jones, Barrington, Rhode Island 

Brian O. Mulligan, Seattle, Washington 

1964 Harold G. Hillier, Winchester, England 
Henry J. Hohman, Kingsville, Maryland 

1965 John Lewis Creech, Washington, D. C. 

Dorothy St. John Manks, Cambridge, Massachusetts 
Peter John Mezitt, Hopkinton, Massachusetts 
Mrs. Edwin Sibley Webster, Boston, Massachusetts 

1966 Ethel Zoe Bailey, Ithaca, New York 

Louise Bush-Brown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Alfred James Fordham, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Clarence Edwin Godshalk, Lisle, Illinois 
Claudia Taylor Johnson, Washington, D. C. 

1967 Henry Marcellus Cathey, Beltsville, Maryland 
Fred Carroll Sargent, Salem, Massachusetts 
Fletcher Steele, Pittsford, New York 

Sidney Waxman, Storrs, Connecticut 



EXECUTIVE SECRETARY'S REPORT 

Many of the accomplishments of the year 1966 
are a part of a foundation for the future. The next 
most serious fundamental problem is that of mem- 
bership, and I feel that 1967 is the year in which 
we reassess our membership structure and policies 
and then go forward to build the membership neces- 
sary to help carry forward the work of the Society. 

The continued response to the editorial content 
of HORTICULTURE from readers all over the 
country is strong indication that we are on the 
right road. An even better one is the fact that we 
have boosted the renewal rate from 43 percent to 
over 60 percent and that nearly 65 percent of all 
renewals are for a three year period. This is good, 
solid support and helps reduce the variables in 
circulation income. The magazine still isn't every- 
thing we would like it to be, but we look forward 
to the day when we can enlarge its editorial scope 
and add more pages to each issue. 

Some of our lectures, workshops and special 
shows have diminished in number because of lack 
of participation and response on the part of mem- 
bers, exhibitors and the general public, and we feel 
that we must find more effective ways in which to 
reach more people. 

The evaluation of such activities and the evolu- 
tion, where needed, into a more up-to-date format, 
is difficult and slow, and sometimes members mis- 
understand the steps along the way. 

While some of the activities for members have 
been undergoing change, we have stepped up our 
role of service to the community. As representa- 
tives of this Society, other members of the staff and 
I have served on several committees and have given 
assistance to many local and national programs and 
projects. 

While the building and program analysis and 



report was the most significant and fundamental 
achievement of the year, we also can look to 1966 
as the year in which a program was launched which 
promises to have far reaching results. It all began 
when a member of the Society who was attending 
a Tuesday evening series of lectures on landscaping 
which I was giving, came up to me after one of the 
classes and said, "Mr. Lees, I wish we could do 
something about a neighborhood gardening pro- 
gram in Roxbury." 

From this beginning came the establishment of 
the Pilot Garden at Erie and Ellington Streets, 
Dorchester, and, for the first time, the establishment 
of the 4-H program within the City of Boston. 

In addition to acting as an instrument to bring 
the necessary co-ordinating agencies together, such 
as the Massachusetts 4-H Foundation and the 
Co-operative Extension Service of the University 
of Massachusetts, the Society also subsidized a 
course in practical gardening (given by Mrs. Lucien 
Taylor, in Dover) for potential leaders from Rox- 
bury. We provided the design for the garden, 
helped find materials and plants, and gave support 
through lectures and meetings at Robert Gould 
Shaw House and in Horticultural Hall with leaders. 
(See photographs pages 1 and 2.) 

The potential of this program can make your 
head spin, but its basic purpose is to teach every 
man that he has within himself the power to im- 
prove his environment and the responsibility to 
maintain it. The future of the American landscape 
depends on so simple a lesson. 

Looking back has been exciting, but ahead is 
even more so. We need ideas, we need money, but 
most of all we need, desperately, members who 
can roll up their sleeves and go to work. 

Won't you help? 

Carlton B. Lees, Executive Secretary 



15 



STAFF 

Carlton B. Lees, Executive Secretary 

Director of Exhibitions 
Director of Publications 

Jay Stinson, Coordinator of Education 

Joanne Settino, Secretary 

Bette Levine, Show Secretary 

Manuel Costa, Stock Control 

BUSINESS OFFICE 

Myron Bates, Business Manager 
Marion Costa, Bookkeeper 
Linda Parsons, Clerk 

PUBLICITY 

Jeanne Wadleigh, Press Secretary 
Lorraine M. Cantalupo, Assistant 

LIBRARY 

Muriel C. Crossman, Librarian 
Aileen Johnson, Circulation 
Edith Stone, Cataloging & Reference 
Susan Gifford, Assistant 

MEMBERSHIP 

Mary C. Rochefort, Membership Secretary 
Sandra Baker, Assistant 

BUILDING & MAINTENANCE 

C. Hooper Jackson, Superintendent 

Walter Stoll Ernest Huntoon Elmer McPhee 

HORTICULTURE 

EDITORIAL 

Edwin F. Steffek, Editor 
Laura E. Hatton, Assistant Editor 
Richard C. Hands, Assistant Editor 
CIRCULATION 

Arthur B. Pausch, Circulation Manager 
Lillian Misner, Secretary 
Karen Hicks, Clerk 
Agnes Gallagher, Clerk 
Janis McPhail, Clerk 

ADVERTISING 

Arthur C. King, Advertising Manager 

Patricia A. Salvatore, Assistant 

Theresa G.B. McNamara, Classified Advertising 



COMMITTEES 1967-1968 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Oliver F. Ames, Chairman 
Frederick S. Moseley III 
George Putnam 
John O. Stubbs 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Oliver F. Ames, Chairman 
Frederick S. Moseley III 
John O. Stubbs 

BUDGET COMMITTEE 

Oliver F. Ames, Chairman 
Frederick S. Moseley III 
George Putnam 
John O. Stubbs 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Vincent N. Merrill, Chairman 1968 

Milford Lawrence 1968 

Mrs. G. Kennard Wakefield 1969 

George Putnam 1969 

Russell B. Clark 1970 

Dr. Donald Wyman 1970 

MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE 

Mrs. Charles F. Hovey, Chairman 
Russell B. Clark 
Robert N. Elwell 

LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

Mrs. G. Kennard Wakefield, Chairman 

C. Roy Boutard 

Gordon Dillon 

Mrs. Thorvald S. Ross 

Dr. Donald Wyman 

LECTURE & PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE 
John O. Stubbs, Chairman 
Mrs. John M. Hall, Co-Chairman 
Vincent N. Merrill 



GARDENS COMMITTEE 

Mrs. G. Kennard Wakefield, Chairman 
Russell B. Clark 
Milford Lawrence 
Vincent N. Merrill 
Miss Helen C. Moseley 

SPECIAL MEDALS COMMITTEE 
Dr. Donald Wyman, Chairman 
C. Roy Boutard 
Allen W. Hixon 
Vincent N. Merrill 
George Putnam 

EXHIBITIONS COMMITTEE 

George Putnam, Chairman 
Mrs. Charles Batchelder 
Vincent N. Merrill 
Edmund Mezitt 
Dr. John Naegele 

COMMITTEE ON PRIZES 

Allen W. Hixon, Chairman 

Dr. Donald Wyman, Co-Chairman 

Roger Coggeshall 

John Hurley 

COMMITTEE ON CHILDREN'S 
GARDEN EXHIBITIONS 

Russell B. Clark, Chairman 
Mrs. Cyrus Brewer 
Henry G. Wendler 

ALBERT C. BURRAGE GOLD VASE COMMITTEE 

Vincent N. Merrill, Chairman 
Russell B. Clark 
Allen W. Hixon 
George Putnam 
Dr. Donald Wyman 

COMMITTEE ON BUILDING 

Oliver F. Ames, Chairman 

Vincent N. Merrill 

Mrs. G. Kennard Wakefield 



16 



OFFICERS & TRUSTEES 




■■■! 




y 



i*N, 




Oliver F. Ames 
Acting President 



John O. Stubbs 
Vice President (1969) 




Carlton B. Lees 

Executive Secretary 

Director of Publications 

Director of Exhibitions 



TERMS TO EXPIRE 1968 



TERMS TO EXPIRE 1969 



TERMS TO EXPIRE 1970 







f J 







Mrs. John M. Hall 



Allen M. Hixon 



Russell B. Clark 



Robert N. Elwell 



;, .-- ! -,-,.« 




Milford R. Lawrence Vincent N. Merrill 





Edmund Mezitt Mrs. G. Kennard Wakefield 



Mrs. Charles F. Hovey Mrs. Edwin S. Webster Dr. Donald Wyman 



HONORARY TRUSTEES: Albert C. Burr age • Seth L. Kelsey • Harold W. Knowlton • Harold D. Stevenson • Mrs. Roger S. Warner